Charts / Trends

1. What it does

Charts enable you to study your sleep from a long-term perspective.

Charts are here to help you find patterns in your sleep and enable you to decide for evidence-based changes.

2. Where to find it

Left ☰ menu → Trends

3. Charts explanation

Date range: Each chart is computed from data within a certain date range. This range is controlled by the first dropdown menu in the top bar.

Tags: All charts can be configured to be only computed from sleep records with a certain tag. You can select the tag in the second dropdown menu in the top bar.

3.1. Trend

3.1.1. Sleep score

sleepscore

Sleep score radar chart is another way of looking at your sleep score.

You can fill each of the sleep score section with up to 5 points. The more points you have in a given section, the more healthy that dimension of your sleep is.

How should it look?

The goal is of course to fill up that chart completely!

3.1.2. Deficit

deficit

Deficit chart is useful for tracking your sleep deficit.
- Blue line: shows the deficit on a given day. If you sleep less then your ideal sleep time, the blue line will be negative on that day. If you sleep more, it will be positive.

  • Red / green line: This line shows the total deficit/surplus. The most interesting point of the deficit chart is the rightmost point of this line. If it’s red, it means that you have a sleep debt currently. If it’s green, you are oversleeping your target.

How should it look?

You should strive to have zero sleep deficit, so ideally all of the lines should aim to be around 0 hours all the time.

3.1.3. Duration

duration

Duration chart shows you the evolution of your sleep lengths.

  • Blue line: Shows all-time average duration.

  • Green line: Either shows actual duration (when date range is quarter-year or lower) on a given day or a 30-day average (when date range is half-year or higher).

    • Actual duration: Each point corresponds to the sleep duration on that day.

    • 30-day average: Each point on this line is the average sleep duration of that day and each day in the past 30 days from it.

      The point at 30 May is the average of sleep durations from 1 May through 30 May.
      The point at 4 May is the average of sleep duration from 5 April through 4 May.

How should it look?

The chart should not have many extremes (regular, periodic chart is normal).

3.1.4. Irregularity

irregularity

Irregularity chart shows you how much is your sleep irregular. The higher the line is, the more irregular your sleep is.

  • Blue line: Shows the irregularity for each day.

How should it look?

While some irregularity is normal, you should strive to keep it to minimum - keep the line at low values.

3.1.5. Deep sleep %

deepsleep percentage

Deep sleep % chart shows you how your deep sleep percentage has been changing recently – effectively how well did you sleep.

Deep sleep percentage means "a portion of your sleep duration when you’ve been in deep sleep". So if you had an 8-hour slumber, 50% deep sleep percentage would mean 4 hours in deep sleep. So what this graph shows is how effectively are you able to sleep.

  • Deep blue line: Shows actual deep sleep percentage on a given day.

  • Light blue line: Shows all-time average deep sleep percentage.

How should it look?

The average should be kept over 30%.

3.1.6. Deep sleep

deepsleep

Deep sleep chart shows you how your deep sleep duration has been changing recently.

This graph shows how many hours of deep sleep have you been getting recently.

  • Deep blue line: Shows actual deep sleep duration on a given day.

  • Light blue line: Shows all-time average deep sleep duration.

How should it look?

The graph should not have many spikes - ideally should be regular, flat line, above 2 hours.

3.1.7. Awake

awake

Awake chart shows you how much you’ve been waking up during your sleep.

  • Green line: Shows actual awake duration during sleep on a given day.

  • Light blue line: Shows all-time average awake during sleep.

How should it look?

In an ideal world, you should not wake up at all during sleep. This means a flat line at the bottom.

3.1.8. Efficiency

efficiency

Efficiency chart shows the ratio of actually sleeping when you’re in bed.

  • Green line: Shows actual sleep efficiency on a given day.

  • Light blue line: Shows all-time average efficiency.

How should it look?

Ideally a flat line at 100%.

3.1.9. Snoring %

snoring percentage

Snoring percentage chart shows how much of the time you sleep did you spend snoring.

  • Violet line: Shows snoring percentage on a given day.

  • Light blue line: Shows all-time average snoring percentage.

How should it look?

Ideally a flat line at 0%.

3.1.10. Snoring

snoring

Snoring chart shows how much time did you spend snoring.

  • Violet line: Shows snoring duration on a given day.

  • Light blue line: Shows all-time average snoring duration.

How should it look?

Ideally a flat line at 0 minutes.

3.1.11. Graphs

graphs

Graphs, or "sleep bars", show the intensity of movement during sleep. Each bar is one sleep. At the bottom, the charts start with 12PM and go up to the next 12PM. The greener the bar is at any given point, the more intensive movement there was.

How should it look?

As the sleep bars are just another view at the actigraph, they should ideally follow the same rules as the actigraph: they should show regular sleep cycles that get shorter towards the end of the sleep.

3.1.12. Fall asleep hour

fall asleep hour

Fall asleep hour chart shows when you’ve been going to bed.

  • Green line: Shows the actual hour when you started sleep tracking.

  • Light blue line: Shows all-time average.

How should it look?

Ideally a flat line with no spikes.

3.1.13. Smart wakeup

smart wakeup

Smart wakeup shows how many minutes before the set alarm did smart wake up wake you up - ie. the efficiency of smart wake up for you.

  • Green line: Shows how many minutes before the set alarm did smart wakeup wake you up at the given day.

  • Light blue line: Shows all-time average.

How should it look?

It should be consistently between zero and your set smart period. If it’s at one of the extremes, you should adjust the smart wakeup sensitivity.

3.1.14. Snooze

Snooze chart shows how many minutes you’ve been snoozing your alarm.

  • Green line: Shows the actual snooze duration for each day.

  • Light blue line: Shows all-time average of your snoozing.

How should it look?

There are no hard and fast rules on snoozing, but it sure is a sign of a strong willpower to keep it at zero!

3.2. Tags

This section shows you characteristics of all sleeps that have a certain tag. You can for example find out whether your snoring is higher on sleeps that have an #alcohol tag, or whether rating is higher on sleeps with #sport tag.

Each chart also includes the average value of all your sleeps for reference.

Warning This section shows only sleeps that have at least one tag.
Note You can further filter the sleeps by another tag in the top menu!

3.2.1. Duration

duration

Shows average durations (in hours) of sleeps with a certain tag.

3.2.2. Deep sleep %

deepsleep percentage

Shows average deep sleep percentage of sleeps with a certain tag.

3.2.3. Rating

rating

Shows average rating of sleeps with a certain tag.

3.2.4. Snoring

Shows average snoring durations (in minutes) of sleeps with a certain tag.

3.2.5. Awake

awake

Shows average awake durations (in minutes) of sleeps with a certain tag.

3.3. Chronotype

Chronotype is a term used to characterise your sleep patterns. It is a spectrum ranging from 100% night owl to 100% morning lark. Read more on Chronotype.

Note Chronotype statistics need least a month of sleep data.

3.3.1. Mid-sleep hour

midsleephour

Shows where your all-time average mid-sleep hour stands in comparison to other people (data taken from SleepCloud). Your mid-sleep hour is highlighted.

If your mid-sleep hour is more to the right, you are a night owl. If it’s more to the left, you’re a morning lark.

3.3.2. Chronotype trend

chronotype trend

Shows the evolution of your chronotype. If you switched chronotypes at some point, there might’ve been some specific event like job change etc.

3.3.3. Social jetlag clusters

jetlag clusters

Shows your sleeps as points in an XY graph, in order to find your social jet lag.

  • In sleeps more to the left, you woke up earlier. While in sleeps to the right, you woke up later.

  • Sleeps towards the top are longer, while sleeps towards the bottom are shorter.

Most importantly, the sleeps are divided into two clusters - Working days and Free days (see explanation)

How should it look?

Ideally, the two clusters should be very close together, indicating that your social jet lag is very low.

3.3.4. Social jetlag

jetlag

Shows you mid-sleep hour on free days and workdays, and your social jet lag.

How should it look?

Ideally, the two leftmost bars should be very similar in height, so your social jet lag would be very low.

3.4. Advice

3.4.1. Fall asleep hour regression model

fall asleep regression

Fall asleep hour regression model is a chart that helps you decide when you should go to sleep. The aim of this chart is to show you how changes in your fall asleep hour will affect your rating and deep sleep %.

How do we know that? A regression model takes the existing (historical) data, filters out outliers (i.e. extreme values) and then finds a mathematical formula that best fits that data. On the basis of this formula, it is possible to statistically predict future behavior.

You can see two sets of points, and up to two curves.

  • Blue points: Those are average values of your deep sleep % for a given fall asleep hour.

  • Blue curve: Best-fit prediction function that shows what deep sleep % will you have for any given fall asleep hour.

  • Orange points: Those are average values of your rating for a given fall asleep hour.

  • Orange curve: Best-fit prediction function that shows what rating will you have for any given fall asleep hour.

What to do with this?

Take a look at the curve (either blue or orange) and focus on the maximum point or points. At what position (what fall asleep hour) it is? You should go to bed at this hour in order to maximize your deep sleep % (in case of blue line) or rating (in case of orange line).

3.4.2. Duration regression model

duration regression

Duration regression model is a chart that gives you advice on how long should you sleep. The aim of this chart is to show you how changes in your sleep duration hour will affect your rating and deep sleep %.

How do we know that? A regression model takes the existing (historical) data, filters out outliers (i.e. extreme values) and then finds a mathematical formula that best fits that data. On the basis of this formula, it is possible to statistically predict future behavior.

You can see two sets of points, and up to two curves.

  • Blue points: Those are average values of your deep sleep % for a given sleep duration.

  • Blue curve: Best-fit prediction function that shows what deep sleep % will you have for any given sleep duration.

  • Orange points: Those are average values of your rating for a given sleep duration.

  • Orange curve: Best-fit prediction function that shows what rating will you have for any given sleep duration.

What to do with this?

Take a look at the curve (either blue or orange) and focus on the maximum point or points. At what position (what sleep duration) it is? You should try to sleep for that long in order to maximize your deep sleep % (in case of blue line) or rating (in case of orange line).

3.4.3. Fall asleep hour vs. deep sleep % / rating

Shows you average values of deep sleep % / rating for sleeps that started at a given fall asleep hour.

3.4.4. Fall asleep hour vs. sleep duration

Shows you average values of sleep duration for sleeps that started at a given fall asleep hour.

3.4.5. Weekday vs. deep sleep % / rating

Shows you average values of deep sleep % / rating for sleeps that started at a given day.

3.4.6. Weekday vs. sleep duration

Shows you average values of sleep duration for sleeps that started at a given day.

3.4.7. Fall asleep hour vs. snoring

Shows you average values of snoring for sleeps that started at a given fall asleep hour.